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A current snapshot of the state of 3D printing in hand rehabilitation

Published:March 07, 2020DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jht.2019.12.018

      Abstract

      3D printing is often discussed in the field of hand rehabilitation, yet many hand therapists are unaware of this technology and how it either is used or could potentially be used in rehabilitation. To shed some light on the state of 3D printing in hand rehabilitation, we sought insight from a rehabilitation engineer, occupational therapy educator, clinician, and hospital administrator to provide a comprehensive look at the state of 3D printing today.

      Keywords

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      JHT Read for Credit

      Quiz: # 668

      Record your answers on the Return Answer Form found on the tear-out coupon at the back of this issue or to complete online and use a credit card, go to JHTReadforCredit.com. There is only one best answer for each question.
      • # 1.
        Traditional sculpting utilizes _____________ construction techniques
        • a.
          positive
        • b.
          formulaic
        • c.
          subtractive
        • d.
          additive
      • # 2.
        3D printing utilizes ___________ manufacturing techniques
        • a.
          additive
        • b.
          negative
        • c.
          positive
        • d.
          neutral
      • # 3.
        The following may be said of the state of the art for constructing upper extremity orthoses utilizing 3D printing techniques
        • a.
          the digital design is the most time-consuming part of the process
        • b.
          the learning curve is steep
        • c.
          most currently practicing CHTs are not qualified to employ these techniques
        • d.
          all of the above
      • # 4.
        There _______ categories of 3D printing manufacturing processes
        • a.
          5
        • b.
          6
        • c.
          7
        • d.
          10
      • # 5.
        There are currently numerous purpose-built software programs for use in the making of upper extremity orthotic devices
        • a.
          true
        • b.
          false
      When submitting to the HTCC for re-certification, please batch your JHT RFC certificates in groups of 3 or more to get full credit.